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Some Thoughts On Treating Microscopic Colitis
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tex
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30706
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 3:59 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2015 4:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Erica,

It's best (safest) to wait until normal BMs have been the rule for at least several weeks (preferably longer). I don't claim to be a coprologist or scatologist, but IMO a rating of at least a Bristol scale 4 would be desirable. That said, some members have tried new foods sooner. The main point is that you have to be doing well enough that if you have some sort of reaction you will be able to detect it without any question. Sometimes initial reactions to a new food will be mild, and increase with additional exposures. The farther along we are with healing, the easier it becomes to spot such minor reactions.

What you don't want to happen is to try a food and not be able to definitely decide whether or not you are reacting to it, or to something else. Testing new foods is usually not nearly as easy as it appears, because there are almost always complicating issues that can confound the results. That's what makes the EnteroLab results so beneficial.

Obviously, in such a situation where one is still in the early stages of recovery, testing foods that virtually everyone finds to be safe, will be more productive than testing riskier foods.

Tex
_________________
cowboy

It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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Erica P-G
Rockhopper Penguin
Rockhopper Penguin


Joined: 08 Mar 2015

Posts: 1258
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 1:59 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, Dairy, Eggs, Soy, Tuna, Beef, Oat, Almonds, Walnuts
Location: WA State

PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2015 4:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ok, Thanks Tex.

That's what I needed to hear, I should be getting my Enterolab kit any day now and in the mean time I have been trying to narrow my foods down to what I feel is helping me at the moment.

One other question, if I'm only eating Turkey, Potato, White rice, Chicken broth (sometimes made into a soup with a small amount of carrot and celery) and Rice Chex/Cinnamon with Coconut milk, those ought to be fairly safe correct? I'm assuming Potato is still ok and chicken, if I find they aren't(because of Enterolab) I like sweet potato but on my blood tests it said to avoid it, I guess what I'm trying to say is just because it says avoid on the blood test does it hurt to try it and see if I react at this stage in the game. It's one of those ODD avoids on my list I pretty much know to stay away from GF, DF, SF and EF right now, and it isn't a grain like corn, which I am avoiding just because. Also an Apple, I know right now fruit is not my friend, but what is in an apple to set someone off?

Thanks, I'm starting to do better.....but it is a sloooww start Wink
Erica
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tex
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30706
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 3:59 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Thu May 28, 2015 4:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Erica,

Yes, statistically speaking, your current diet is probably safe, and of course the EnteroLab results will soon cast the deciding vote on chicken and potato.

Probably, if you were to test sweet potato and fail the test, it would only cause relatively minor problems for a day or so, rather than a major reaction that would put you back to square one. Of course we are all different, so there are never any guarantees with MC, but for most of us, sweet potato would be a low-risk item.

Outside of the fiber, Apple's primary distinction is probably its malic acid content. Most of us aren't particularly bothered by malic acid, though. Apple has the same problem as most fruits in general however, namely a significant fructose content.

Apple juice malabsorption: fructose or sorbitol?

You're most welcome,
Tex
_________________
cowboy

It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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Shunya

United States

Joined: 28 Sep 2016

Posts: 1
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 3:59 AM


Food Intolerances : Wheat, dairy
Location: San francisco

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2016 6:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

HI - this is my first posting here though I have tried many dietary plans for other autoimmune issues. I need to eat more, not less, so do not want to eliminate anything unnecessarily. Is there a good place to see what foods typically flare MC?
thanks!
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Gabes-Apg
Emperor Penguin
Emperor Penguin


Joined: 21 Dec 2009

Posts: 7192
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 7:59 PM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, Yeast, Caesin, Soy, salad/raw veges and fruit
Location: Hunter Valley NSW Australia

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:18 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

welcome Shunya!

based on what we have learnt from over 2000 members;
over 90% react to Gluten and excess fibre
over 75% react to Dairy (lactose and Caesin)
around the 60% react to Soy, Eggs

beyond that each person reacts to individual type ingredients, ie one person can handle chicken ok, others cant.

we have prepared a guidelines for recovery - to help people adjust to MC gut healing eating plan..
http://www.perskyfarms.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=79

hope this helps
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Gabes Ryan

"Anything that contradicts experience and logic should be abandoned"
Dalai Lama
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tex
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30706
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 3:59 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Thu Sep 29, 2016 11:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Shunya,

welcome Most people mistakenly assume that a restricted diet requires eating less (total volume, nutrients, etc.). That's simply not true. A restricted diet merely requires eating less variety. Variety is a relatively recent innovation in human history. Prior to approximately a hundred years or so ago, most people (except for royalty and the very wealthy) ate a very limited diet. Diets were determined mostly by what was available locally.

With the advent of mechanization and transportation innovations, foods from outside sources became available, and gradually, foods from all over the world became available almost everywhere in developed countries. But that's not the way our digestive systems evolved. Most primitive societies ate a very, very limited diet, that varied seasonally, in some locations.

So as industrialization progressed, variety in the average citizen's diet became widely available as a product of increasing affluence, but variety has never been a necessity. When recovering from MC, the simpler our diet (fewer ingredients), the faster our digestive system heals, and the faster we recover.

The solution is simple. Forget variety and eat more of the few foods that you can safely eat. After you have been in remission long enough to allow your gut to do some serious healing, then you can experiment with adding some variety back into your diet. But a recovery diet for MC definitely does not meet the definition of a gourmet lifestyle, and no one should expect it to be. An MC recovery diet is the medicine that will heal your gut. Until we are in stable remission, everything else is secondary to recovery.

Again, welcome aboard and please feel free to ask anything.

Tex
_________________
cowboy

It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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