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willabec
Adélie Penguin
Adélie Penguin
United States

Joined: 30 Nov 2010

Posts: 147
User's local time:
2017 Sep 22 - 5:49 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten/wheat- celiac

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 4:54 am    Post subject: soluable fiber Reply with quote

i had heard that fiber is not the greatest when it comes to colitis, but i had recently read that soluable fiber could be beneficial to people with colitis- thoughts? can any kind of fiber cause d in colitis patients?
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tex
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30469
User's local time:
2017 Sep 22 - 5:49 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 6:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

willabec wrote:
can any kind of fiber cause d in colitis patients?


Yes.

Tex
_________________
cowboy

It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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willabec
Adélie Penguin
Adélie Penguin
United States

Joined: 30 Nov 2010

Posts: 147
User's local time:
2017 Sep 22 - 5:49 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten/wheat- celiac

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 7:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

so i am to assume that what i have read, about soluable fiber good for colitis sufferers is not accurate? what is the difference between insoluable and soluable in terms of colitis and it causing d? i thought soluable fiber was to help bulk up stool?
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tex
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30469
User's local time:
2017 Sep 22 - 5:49 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

willabec wrote:
so i am to assume that what i have read, about soluable fiber good for colitis sufferers is not accurate?


That's correct, in my opinion.

willabec wrote:
what is the difference between insoluable and soluable in terms of colitis and it causing d? i thought soluable fiber was to help bulk up stool?


There is little difference as far as MC is concerned. Insoluble fiber is worse than soluble fiber, but both kinds irritate the gut, and help to perpetuate MC symptoms. The physical/chemical difference between soluble and insoluble fiber is that soluble fiber absorbs water, and creates a gel, during the digestive process, while insoluble fiber is not water soluble, and not digestible.

Do you ever read any threads on this board other than the ones that you start? I've posted many times in the past year about how fiber damages the intestines. Fiber damages the cells in the intestines, and causes them to die. That causes inflammation. Here's a link to my latest post about it, which was only 4 days ago. Click on the first link in my post, and read what Dr. Eades has to say about fiber. And he's not even talking about MC - he thinks it's bad for everyone. That's exactly what I've been saying about fiber, and why no one with MC should be eating it.

http://www.perskyfarms.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=14786

Tex
_________________
cowboy

It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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sarkin
Rockhopper Penguin
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Joined: 10 Mar 2011

Posts: 2313
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2017 Sep 22 - 6:49 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, dairy, eggs (maybe more?)
Location: Brooklyn, NY

PostPosted: Mon Oct 17, 2011 9:15 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I answered in your other thread -

In my opinion, it's a weird idea, when we're having huge amounts of watery D, that what we need is to "bulk up" stool. We need to turn the volume DOWN, not up!

Adding fiber to an inflamed system is irritating, whether soluble or insoluble. Imagine yourself with an internal sunburn - anything like "scrubbing" is exactly what you'd want to avoid.

My vote is for getting at the root cause. I also vote (as I said in your other thread) that anyone who recommends that an MC sufferer take a lot of fiber should be sentenced to spending a few weeks with MC symptoms. Then we'll see exactly how wonderful they think that extra fiber is...

ON THE OTHER HAND - if you're taking it, and it's helping - then that trumps my opinion. If you're still having D or it got worse, I would drop it! Polly has posted in the past that soluble fiber can actually be worse than insoluble, for those of us having active symptoms.
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Babs554

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Joined: 03 Nov 2015

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 4:52 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How do I tell what has fiber so I don't eat it
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Babs554

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 4:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the first time I have ever posted so sorry if I didn't do correctly
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Babs554

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 4:59 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is the first time I have ever posted so sorry if I didn't do correctly
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T
Adélie Penguin
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Joined: 30 Nov 2014

Posts: 203
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Food Intolerances : gluten dairy soy
Location: OHIO

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 5:28 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Google high fiber foods and you will have A list to avoid



T
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Babs554

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 5:34 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thank you! And then if I have to fodmap diet I can cross off the ones I can't eat. Right?
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T
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Joined: 30 Nov 2014

Posts: 203
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Food Intolerances : gluten dairy soy
Location: OHIO

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 5:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I just looked at A fodmap diet.
Looks to me like A lot to cross off.
I would stick to rice tender cooked carrots ,potatoes (skinless)and maybe green beans plus the meats you can tolerate.
I stay with chicken most of the time.

T
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tex
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30469
User's local time:
2017 Sep 22 - 5:49 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 6:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Babs,

Welcome to the discussion board.

In addition to what Terry said, most foods contain some fiber, so you can't totally avoid it. The idea is to avoid eating large servings of high fiber foods. Small to moderate amounts are usually OK. Some people can tolerate much more fiber than others, so it's impossible to put an exact number on how much fiber a safe recovery diet should contain. Most of the fiber in fruits and vegetables is in the peel, so it's always a good idea to remove the peel and overcook any fruits and vegetables in the diet. Most of us try to avoid most fruit, because in addition to the fiber, it contains a lot of sugar (fructose) that is difficult for us to digest when our intestines are inflamed.

Tex
_________________
cowboy

It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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Babs554

unknown IP

Joined: 03 Nov 2015

Posts: 7
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2017 Sep 22 - 5:49 AM




PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 6:48 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To the both of you thank you thank you.
I have never posted on a board before but this is the only place I have gotten so much wonderful information!! If you could give me a few tidbits of advice regarding stay g symptom free what would it be?
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T
Adélie Penguin
Adélie Penguin


Joined: 30 Nov 2014

Posts: 203
User's local time:
2017 Sep 22 - 7:49 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten dairy soy
Location: OHIO

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Babs

Read all you can here, what works for one might not work for another.
Start slow and simple it takes time to heal the gut.
Google low fiber low residue diet it will help that's where I started.
Cook with coconut oil .
Make your own bone broth.
Cross contamination will cause A flair. ( I am trying to get over A BIG flair now from cross contamination).
No spices only salt.


T
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tex
Site Admin
Site Admin


Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30469
User's local time:
2017 Sep 22 - 5:49 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Sun Dec 06, 2015 8:04 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Babs,

We're sorry that you needed to find us, but we're happy that you've joined us. Here are a few random tips to add to what Terry posted:

To stay symptom free, we have to carefully avoid the foods that cause us to react at all times, even tiny trace amounts. It's best to avoid commercially-processed foods (home cooking from scratch is much safer), but if you do buy any commercially-processed foods, be sure to read the labels carefully to make sure that they do not contain anything that might cause you to react. If you eat in restaurants, be sure that the chef (not just the waitress or waiter) understands your needs.

To reduce the chances of buying a product that contains ingredients that might be cross-contaminated because of an ingredient suppler error that the manufacturer is unaware of, always buy products with a minimal number of ingredients. Anything with more than 5 ingredients significantly increases the chances of being cross-contaminated. Whenever you're unsure of an ingredient on a label, it's best to skip that purchase, and find a safer alternative.

If anyone in the house uses wheat flour, it is almost impossible to prevent your food from being contaminated, because flour dust goes everywhere. If someone uses wheat bread, or any other product containing gluten, be sure to wipe counter tops carefully before preparing your own food there, and remember that your hands can spread bread crumbs, so wash them before handling your own food. Never use a knife or fork or spoon that was used with conventional food unless it has been properly washed. Always use a dedicated toaster of your own because toasters are notorious for containing gluten from wheat toast. The same applies to toaster ovens. If you use a toaster oven, place foil under your own food so that it cannot contact a rack or shelf where other food has been.

Check the labels on any supplements, and be sure that any medications you take do not contain unsafe ingredients. Some of us react to shampoos, and skin products, and read the label on your toothpaste, lipstick or other lip balms. Some members have even had problems with hand soap.

Tex
_________________
cowboy

It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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