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LIST OF FOODS I'VE TESTED OR ELIMINATED
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Gloria
King Penguin
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Joined: 07 Jul 2007

Posts: 4761
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2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten, soy, casien, eggs, legumes, Pepto Bismol, all fruit except mango, all vegetables, tomatoes, onions, peppers, carrageenan, chicken, beef, orange roughy, cucumber, vinegar, chocolate, olives, buckwheat, millet, tapioca, sorghum, rice
Location: Illinois

PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't think you can go wrong following the Paleo diet. Some of the people on the board who eat Paleo and post regularly are Polly and Matthew. Mary Beth (mbeezie) is also trying it, I believe. You can find more information here: http://www.perskyfarms.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=49

I've always wondered what constitutes breakfast on the Paleo diet myself. I'm not able to eat eggs or fruit, so my breakfasts are pretty limited. You might want to send Polly or Matthew a private message or post your question in the Paleo forum listed above.

Gloria
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tex
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Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30706
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2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Mary,

Breakfast on the paleo diet is usually quite different from what we've been accustomed to. Here are some past threads with a lot of example meals. Look for posts by Polly, Matthew, Karen, (moremuscle), and Joanna, (harvest_table), for paleo diet suggestions.

http://www.perskyfarms.com/phpBB2/viewforum.php?f=53

The paleo diet will allow you to do what you have in mind.

Tex
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It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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Jan
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Joined: 27 Oct 2008

Posts: 371
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2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : Oats, Barley,
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Tue Nov 03, 2009 4:50 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Mary,

I also gained weight due to steriods. After I got into remission I was able to get the weight off. I follow a modified Paleo diet so it does work for both instances. I'm now working off the weight I gained when I quit smoking.

Breakfast will definitely be different. I usually have something left over from dinner the night before or I eat eggs. I don't have the gluten sensitivity that a lot of folks have but I have gotten out of the daily habit of cereal and milk.

Good luck on your journey.

Jan
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PaigeP



Joined: 29 Jun 2010

Posts: 11
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 6:08 AM


Food Intolerances : cucumbers, peppers, garlic, seeds, and a lot I just don't know yet.
Location: Fernandina Beach, FL

PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 9:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

What a great list, and you're really approaching this scientifically. I wish I had that discipline. I'm relying on Entocort heavily at this point and basically eating whatever sounds good to my tummy.
I ate pizza the other night, though, and paid for it dearly the next day. I don't know if it was the crust, spices or cheese. There was no meat, because I'm a vegetarian.

By the way, I read somewhere that soy was a good substitute for dairy for people with CC or at least maybe for IBS. But it seems to cause a lot of problems for you all. Do you know why soy is a culprit? I'm going to have a hard time eliminating that one because it is a HUGE part of my diet and my pain source of protein and calcium.

Quote:
One half of the world cannot understand the pleasures of the other.
Jane Austen, Emma

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Paige Poechmann
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tex
Site Admin
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Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30706
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 11:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Paige,

Approximately half of us are sensitive to soy. Hopefully, you are part of the half who are not sensitive to soy, since it is virtually impossible to remain healthy on a vegetarian diet without soy, (because if you are sensitive to soy, you will also be very likely to be sensitive to the other legumes used as protein source, including beans, peas, alfalfa, peanuts, etc.).

To answer your question about why we are sensitive to soy, here is my interpretation of the issue:

As basic background information, you have to be aware that when the genes that predispose to microscope colitis are triggered, (thus opening the door for the development of microscopic colitis), the genes that predispose to certain food sensitivities, (primarily gluten and casein), are also triggered, simultaneously, in most of us, (although not in everyone). This fact has been substantiated by research published by Dr. Ken Fine, (founder of Enterolab, in Dallas TX). Peptides are the result of an intermediate stage in the digestion process. As digestion continues, most peptides are subsequently split into the individual amino acids of which they are comprised, so that they can be absorbed as nutrients. For those that cannot be successfully digested, however, and persist as peptides, (IOW, as an amino acid chain), they can be perceived as foreign "invaders", by the immune system, thus triggering an immune system response. Most of the peptides to which we are sensitive, have a very similar amino acid sequence arrangement. For an explanation of how that works, in detail, please see post number 10, in the thread at this link, where I discuss the basic principle of "allergen mimicry":

http://www.perskyfarms.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php...+similar+peptides

Although soy is not even mentioned in that discussion, the odds are extremely high that soy has one or more peptides within it's primary protein amino acid chain, which closely resemble the gliadin, (or glutenin), peptides in wheat gluten, to which we react. They are apparently similar enough to confuse our immune systems, (for those of us who react to them). This is a true autoimmune reaction, (and can be verified by stool tests for IgA antibody levels, (unique to soy), and anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody tests.

FWIW, I am not intolerant of soy, (my Enterolab test was negative for soy), although I do avoid it, for the most part, (I simply dislike soy's propensity for disrupting hormone production - that couldn't be good, in the long run) - I just don't have to worry about avoiding even tiny trace amounts, like some members here.

Tex
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It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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PaigeP



Joined: 29 Jun 2010

Posts: 11
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 6:08 AM


Food Intolerances : cucumbers, peppers, garlic, seeds, and a lot I just don't know yet.
Location: Fernandina Beach, FL

PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 12:39 pm    Post subject: Thank you Tex! Reply with quote

Wow! Thanks so much Tex! I appreciate the explanation. I always thought of soy as my friend but it could be my foe. I might find out someday.
Paige
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Rosie
Rockhopper Penguin
Rockhopper Penguin
United States

Joined: 22 Jun 2009

Posts: 645
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 3:08 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten, dairy,soy
Location: Tucson, AZ

PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 1:53 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tex wrote
Quote:
Although soy is not even mentioned in that discussion, the odds are extremely high that soy has one or more peptides within it's primary protein amino acid chain, which closely resemble the gliadin, (or glutenin), peptides in wheat gluten, to which we react.


Tex, I came across a reference that suggests that the cross-reactivity of soy is with casein, not gluten, and it explains why about half of us are sensitive to soy:

Quote:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9849071
In infants, it is usually a problem with formula intolerance. Because there is up to a 50% crossover intolerance between milk and soy, the infant should be given an extensively hydrolyzed formula.


Rosie
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tex
Site Admin
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Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30706
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Wed Jul 07, 2010 3:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Rosie,

You inspired me to look further, with that observation, and after an hour or so of research, I'm still not satisfied that I'm not overlooking a lot of vital information that connects all this, but here are my thoughts, (at the moment):

While the conclusion of the article you referenced is probably quite correct, (that there is a 50% crossover intolerance between milk and soy), really all that statement does, is to verify what we often point out here, (namely, that about half of us are also intolerant of soy). That research article totally ignores the connection with gluten, and IMO, that relationship is vital to understanding what is involved with this concept.

Apparently, the amino acid strings of the gliadin, glutenin, and casein peptides that we are sensitive to, are all very similar in composition, and this is what I was referring to, in my original discussion. Somewhere, I have bookmarks for references that elucidate these relationships, but I don't recall where they are, at the moment. Of critical interest, IMO, is the fact that it is apparently the failure of the DPP4, (sometimes listed as DPP-IV), enzyme that causes us to end up with these undigested peptides, in the first place. Why does it fail to break down the peptides into their respective amino acids? I never see that addressed in the literature - everyone simply says that we are unable to completely digest gluten. Well why? One would think that the answer to that question would be paramount to any other consideration, in this issue. And yet, everyone simply ignores it? headscratch Am I overlooking something here? did I miss

For example, here are some articles where it is mentioned, but no explanations of why it occurs:

Quote:
DPP IV helps us digest casein and gluten. However, DPP IV has many different functions in the body besides digesting gluten and casein. This protein is known to influence T cells of the immune system. It is also a binding protein for purine, and adenosyl deaminase. Because of this, a problem with DPP IV can throw off the immune system, the amino acid profile, and methylation.


http://www.healthyawareness.com/articles/about-...n-soy-dpp-iv.aspx

Quote:
Gluten intolerance has to do with a failure of a particular enzyme, a peptidase called DPP4.

When the same enzyme is sticking out of a lymphocyte, a cell of our immune/defense system and apparently doing a different job within the body, it is called CD26. Because of the failure or insufficiency of DPP4, an undigested fragment of protein, or peptide, survives and it appears to cause mischief in at least two ways. First, this undigested peptide, looks familiar to the immune/defense system, in other words, it produces a mimicry which is based on digestive weakness among the descendants of peoples who have not been eating wheat long enough to adapt. This will cause symptoms caused by the triggering of an immune response against a suspicious-looking peptide which will resemble a virus to our defense/immune system. Because the gluten-derived peptide is similar to various disease-causing virus, it generates a complex defensive response on the part of the immune system, which does not then find a virus to kill. The next step is damage to tissues by the antibodies aimed at the peptide. This triangle of viral stimulus, immune response, and autoimmune damage is suspected to be a common theme in various illnesses, such as type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and autism. The immune response damages different tissues in different people.

The second way that undigested peptides from gluten cause trouble is by entering the bloodstream. Peptides released from gluten when there is a failure of DPP4 possess another kind of mimicry apart from their resemblance to peptides from viruses. These peptides look like opium and the family of drugs derived from opium: heroin, morphine, codeine, and other semisynthetic derivatives. This understanding is based on the finding of opioid peptides in the urine of individuals with autism and schizophrenia, also from the dramatic withdrawal symptoms that occur in some individuals when they come off gluten. The malaise and irritability strongly resemble a mild version of the kinds of symptoms seen in heroin withdrawal.


http://www.health-matrix.net/2010/06/05/why-milk-is-so-evil/


The first pathway discussed in that quote appears to be a reference to the amino acid sequence similarity, (mimicry), between the alpha-gliadin peptide, (known to activate coeliac disease), and a sequence in the protein of human adenovirus serotype 12 (Ad12), an adenovirus isolated from the human intestinal tract, as discussed in this reference:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1433141/

The second pathway refers, of course, to neurological symptoms, caused by gluten crossing the blood/brain barrier.

Quote:
Why Do You Recommend a Gluten-Free/Casein-Free Diet for Children on the Autism Spectrum?

The diet is one of the very first recommendations we make, and consider it to be a cornerstone of the DAN! Approach. The reasons are many: first, many of the children lack the [dpp4] enzyme that allows them to break down the peptides from gluten and casein. As a result, a subset of autistic individuals have these improperly digested proteins which cross the intestinal membrane, travel in the blood, pass through the blood-brain barrier and interfere with neurotransmission. When this happens, Dr. Karl Reichelt, M.D., Ph.D., and other researchers have shown that these opioid-like substances can be responsible for poor attention, odd behavior, a deficit in socialization skills and poor speech.


http://autism.about.com/od/alternativetreatmens/a/GFCFaltview.htm

Incidentally, the first reference listed here, includes this comment, which I assume is a reference to the same phenomenon expressed in the reference you cited:

Quote:
According to Dr. Kalle Reichelt, soy proteins sometimes cross react with antibodies against casein.


Sooooooooo, apparently soy has a number of options available, for dealing us misery. Sad

Thanks for the inspiration.

Tex
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It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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Gloria
King Penguin
King Penguin


Joined: 07 Jul 2007

Posts: 4761
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten, soy, casien, eggs, legumes, Pepto Bismol, all fruit except mango, all vegetables, tomatoes, onions, peppers, carrageenan, chicken, beef, orange roughy, cucumber, vinegar, chocolate, olives, buckwheat, millet, tapioca, sorghum, rice
Location: Illinois

PostPosted: Wed Dec 08, 2010 9:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I thought that I would post the foods that I am presently eating (in black) and that are keeping the D at bay so that there is a record of how many foods I'm able to add back. I'll add foods to the list as I test them and will color them blue.

I have had Normans and no D since October 11, 2010. I reduced to 6 mg. Entocort/day on Nov. 30. Reduced to 3 mg. Entocort/day on Feb. 4. Reduced to 3 mg. Entocort every other day on Mar. 4. I have suspended testing new foods until I'm safely off Entocort.

Update: I have been off Entocort since April 12, 2011 This has required me to eliminate a few more foods: ghee, Brussels sprouts, soy-free margarine, and almond butter.

Update: I resumed Entocort on August 31, 2011 due to having D or loose BMs 3-5 times a day. I am presently eating 10 foods: turkey, lamb, pork, cauliflower, broccoli, asparagus, corn (flour & starch), almond (flour & milk), arrowroot and avocado.

Meats
turkey
lamb
pork
ham: Nov. 6 - OK

Vegetables
asparagus
Brussels sprouts: May 23 - eliminated
cauliflower
carrots (baby food): Sep. 17 - not OK; deteriorated BMs
sweet potatoes (baby food): Sep. 29 - not OK; deteriorated BMs
broccoli: Dec. 1 - OK
potatoes: Dec. 27 - not OK, deteriorated BMs next two days

Grains/Seeds/Starches
quinoa flour and cracked seed Aug 15-eliminated
brown and white rice flour, milk, grain and cereal July 29-eliminated
amaranth flour - Jan 4-eliminated
arrowroot starch
cornstarch
white corn flour
yellow corn pasta and cereal

Fruits
avocado
banana - 1/4 Feb. 2 - OK; whole Feb 6 - D
blueberries (in muffins)- Jun 23 - not OK; had D
canteloupe - Aug 19 - not OK; had D
olives - Jul 2 - not OK, deteriorated BMs next several days
strawberries - Jun 6 - not OK; had D
low acid tomato - Aug 17 - not OK; had D

Nuts
almond flour, milk and butter: Jan 4 - eliminated nut butter to reduce roughage; Mar 1 - tested a smooth almond butter called Barney - OK; May 30 - eliminated Barney Butter
pistachio butter: Jan 4 - eliminated to reduce roughage
hazelnut butter: Jan 4 - eliminated to reduce roughage
coconut milk and flakes: Oct. 25 - OK Jun 9 -eliminated

Seasonings/Extracts
cane white and brown sugar
maple syrup and sugar
almond extract
maple extract
marjoram
dry mustard
rosemary
sage
salt
vanilla extract: Nov. 27 - OK Jun 9-eliminated (MRT-moderately reactive)
cinnamon: Dec. 10 - OKJul 29-eliminated (MRT-moderately reactive)
ginger: Dec. 14 - OK Jul 29-eliminated

Fats/Oil
ghee - eliminated May 1
walnut oil
canola oil
corn oil
soy-free margarine - tested and eliminated in May

Other
yeast Jul 29-eliminated
Simvastatin - stopped taking Aug 11
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Polly
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Joined: 25 May 2005

Posts: 5165
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Food Intolerances : gluten, dairy, soy, corn, yeast, chocolate, tomato, white potato, celery, sesame, carrot, yellow squash, lamb, pork, mango, strawberry, almond, cashew, vanilla, grapefruit, raspberry, avocado, mustard, paprika, cauliflower, cucumber, plum, and more!
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 9:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Gloria!

That is a helpful way of documenting what you have been able to add back. Any more since then? I am impressed (and envious) by how many grains you seem to tolerate - corn, quinoa, amaranth, etc.

I forget, did you ever do MRT testing, or did you figure it all out by the elimination process? Maybe we should set you up a little corner here on the Board as our resident expert on the elimination diet. I'll bet you must have voluminous notes by now.

I trust all is still going well and that Norman has become a permanent resident! x fingers

Hugs,

Polly
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Gloria
King Penguin
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Joined: 07 Jul 2007

Posts: 4761
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten, soy, casien, eggs, legumes, Pepto Bismol, all fruit except mango, all vegetables, tomatoes, onions, peppers, carrageenan, chicken, beef, orange roughy, cucumber, vinegar, chocolate, olives, buckwheat, millet, tapioca, sorghum, rice
Location: Illinois

PostPosted: Fri Dec 31, 2010 12:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Polly,

I am testing food very slowly and systematically. I would love to add more vegetables, and fruit would be fantastic.

I use 3 tablespoons of amaranth flour in my rice flour muffin mix; otherwise I don't eat it. I'm considering eliminating it because I use so little. My main grains are rice, corn and quinoa. I'm happy and surprised that I can eat corn. Perhaps it's because I avoided it for the first two years after I was diagnosed. I just resumed eating it in March.

I did the MRT testing in March after I tried the elimination diet in February and got much worse from it. The MRT testing showed that I was very reactive to chicken, which explained why the chicken-rice elimination diet didn't work.

I am still doing very well; one Norman per day is my usual pattern. I'm still taking 6 mg. Entocort per day and will try to taper a little more soon, but again I'll do it very slowly.

Gloria
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Polly
Moderator
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Joined: 25 May 2005

Posts: 5165
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2017 Nov 18 - 5:08 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten, dairy, soy, corn, yeast, chocolate, tomato, white potato, celery, sesame, carrot, yellow squash, lamb, pork, mango, strawberry, almond, cashew, vanilla, grapefruit, raspberry, avocado, mustard, paprika, cauliflower, cucumber, plum, and more!
Location: Maryland

PostPosted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 7:52 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gloria,

Any more progress in the past few weeks?

Hugs,

Polly
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Gloria
King Penguin
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Joined: 07 Jul 2007

Posts: 4761
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : gluten, soy, casien, eggs, legumes, Pepto Bismol, all fruit except mango, all vegetables, tomatoes, onions, peppers, carrageenan, chicken, beef, orange roughy, cucumber, vinegar, chocolate, olives, buckwheat, millet, tapioca, sorghum, rice
Location: Illinois

PostPosted: Fri Jan 14, 2011 10:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hi Polly,

Thank you for asking. I don't think I'm ready to test new foods. I've had a few days of less than Norman BMs. Just a little softer- nothing serious, but enough of a change that I've increased to 3 Entocort per day every 4 days (2 Entocort the other three) until I determine what's going on. I suspect nut butters, so I've stopped eating them, amaranth and ghee, for the time being. There isn't much left for me to eliminate, and I think I've reached bottom. Eliminating any more foods will seriously affect my calories and nutrition.

I've had a change in attitude after reading about Grannyh's experiences. Instead of having my first goal be to get off Entocort, my primary goal is to maintain Normans, gain weight, and reduce Entocort slowly. So far, I'm achieving those goals, so I'm satisfied. Basically, I'm more relaxed about my progress.

Gloria
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tex
Site Admin
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Joined: 24 May 2005

Posts: 30706
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 4:08 AM


Food Intolerances : Gluten, casein, soy, and avenin, (avenin is the prolamin in oats, which is equivalent to the gluten in wheat), beef, grapes, peanuts, cashews, almonds, (but nut butters seem OK except for peanuts), citric acid, chocolate, and agar.
Location: Central Texas

PostPosted: Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Gloria,

I agree with the priorities you've decided upon. thumbs up I really believe that's the best approach. The idea that "getting off Entocort" should be a first priority, is strictly a GI doc concept, with no basis in fact. Most GI docs don't have the foggiest idea how long it takes the gut to recover from MC, and until the intestines heal, it's ridiculous to think that treatment should not be continued.

Tex
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It is suspected that some of the hardest material known to science can be found in the skulls of GI specialists who insist that diet has nothing to do with the treatment of microscopic colitis.
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harma
Rockhopper Penguin
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Joined: 04 Oct 2009

Posts: 984
User's local time:
2017 Nov 18 - 12:08 PM


Food Intolerances : lactose, caseine, soy, gluten, yeast, probalby egg (enterolab testing) also problems digesting corn, mushrooms, pepers.
Location: amman

PostPosted: Sat Jan 15, 2011 1:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I agree with you Gloria, I mean with your goal settings, although I would love to stop taking the entocort, having more normans, quiet bowels are more important. Gaining weight is in my case not an issue.

One thing that has played a key role in my recovery process is stop experimenting with food. In my case any time things did go a bit worse, it was always due to new things introduced in the diet. Since I gave that up in late spring 2010, things really got better. It does not mean it is always easy, but it are those small achievements now and than (like my first norman since looong time) that makes it all worth it.

It is almost a combination of achieving remission and beating this disease and a totally new lifestyle.
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